Wednesday, July 4, 2012

Special Event: What the Exciting Discovery of the "God Particle" Means for Philosophy

Nothing.


Seriously. Knock it off.

19 comments:

  1. A great case for convergent realism? (A-la Dirac and the positron?) Anybody?

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  2. It is however a good validation of the scientific method and Popperian philosophy.

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  3. Can we please not use that horrible name that has no relation whatsoever with the Higgs? It's just another particle like all the others.

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  4. HUE HUE HUE HUE HUE HUE HUE HUE HUE HUE HUE HUE HUE HUE HUE HUE

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  5. I once took some students to visit CERN, back in 1988,and was impressed by the magnificent research effort, and we should all be grateful for so much work and time spent to extend our knowledge of the physical universe - well done Peter Higgs and colleagues!

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  6. It's (further) evidence of the relationship between mathematics and the physical world.- That the universe seems mathematically intelligible. It lends a bit more credence to a naturalistic interpretation of cosmic origins (Inflation).

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  7. Ah, but according to Lawrence M Krauss, the meaning of "nothing" has changed, thanks to physics. He says "nothing" is unstable, which is why we have everything.

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  8. ERMAHGERD! SPERDERMERN!

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  9. Nothing - it is part of the creation process - just a bit more knowledge

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  10. mmm — didn't an older scientific theory predict the future observation of the god particle? that might have implications for the realist-antirealist debate.

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  11. The discovery of the God particle proves the God is one and god is everywhere. God is in each and every one of us, so get on your knees and pray bros!!!

    Okay. I joke. But I give the interwebs another 24 hours before the New Age Quantum Bullshitting Bros start preaching some "scientific" proof that we are all one and infinite and that love and unity and -barf.


    That said, philosophy reaches deep into other disciplines - history, economics, psychology, biology - and, yes, physics. So, there are philosophical derivatives to these matters, but no, they shouldn't take us very far - especially because of how preliminary the discovery still is, and that not a lot has actually been uncovered that wasn't already presumed true and hasn't already embedded itself in philosophy.

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  12. The discovery means nothing unless each particle is numbered so we can put God back together in the right order.

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  13. Dear philobro,
    I feel like I need to clarify that this changes ALMOST nothing (almost being the operative word) for Philosophy, but is a huge leap in Physics and will have further implications for scientific research and development that WILL have an impact on philosophy. I don't know what people have been saying, but you're right in a way: its nothing solid in terms of a giant Philosophical impact because many people have already assumed its existence...but its definitely a logical fallacy to say that there's "NO IMPACT AT ALL." Physics and philosophy go hand in hand when we talk about the state of the universe.
    Being a physics major, I hate logical fallacies when people talk about physics. Please stay away from logical fallacies Philobro, I've enjoyed your blog for a long time and this is the first time I've had to speak up. So you're still a bro in my book. Keep up the good summaries broheim.

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  14. It seems that Higgs boson gives mass to itself. How is it possible? Looks like a philosophical question to me.

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    Replies
    1. Actually, that would be a physics question. Science is what we use to describe how things work.

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